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December 10, 2016

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Jennifer

A painful passage beautifully described, Kathy. Good advice, too: in times such as these, we could probably all benefit from practicing to walk backward …

Julene Bair

What a vision, you walking backwards up that hill. Winter is hard, as are the times, although for a different reason. I feel we're all walking backwards.

Brent

Great story, one of my favorites. Reminds me of the times at my parent's cabin at Roberts Lake. In the winter, on arrival, would have to clear several inches of a snowbank before parking the car. There was little to no insulation. Kindling a fire in the wood stove and fireplace was required immediately. Hopefully the fireplace flue would cooperate and there wouldn't be a ton of smoke billowing out into the space. I was often asked to fetch some water, there was a spring near the the waters edge. Several steep steps led down to the spring. The cabin was built on a high hill offering spectacular wintertime sunsets. I remember a lake resident would commute by seaplane. There would be skis attached to the plane for a snowy landing on the lake. There was no indoor bathroom. So when it was below zero outside, the only choice was to use the primitive outhouse. Hopefully there was toilet paper available in the outhouse.

Kathy

Thanks, Brent. Your story sounds like the one time my family spent a week at our Wisconsin cabin in winter--a walk to the spring on the other end of the lake to collect water for drinking and cooking; trips to the outhouse in the morning when it was 20 below zero. And yet 50 some years later I remember that trip vividly and with a lot of pleasure. Something to be said for the hardships and getting down to the bone.

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